Saturday, April 11, 2015

Refusal to keep accounts

If communism is in large part a refusal to keep accounts, then one could make a case for a less narrative poetics, i.e., not obsessed with its own(ed) accounts?

We too easily forget that "these" 3 bananas do not equal "those" 3‎ bananas? The abstraction of number doesn't work well with Plato's idea - ideal image of what stands behind appointed objects.

In other words, the particular/concrete doesn't have universal equivalents? Money is inherently abstract.

‎It is amusing that the etymology of philanthropy is very much the same as the etymology of philanderer.  The etymology = Love + (hu)man.

Not sure what money has to do with it?  Are these two different aspects or articulations of the economy of excess: one emphasizing accumulation and the other emphasizing expenditure?

Do philanthropists necessarily embrace the anthropocene? No. I think the philanthropist loves the genre /abstraction of man - and pays tribute. Philanderers love specific instances of the human - and they spend themselves- directly throwing themselves at and into the lives/bodies of these specific humans.

The antidote to the patriarchy packed into these two ugly terms may be 'polyandry'?

If I could tell a joke it would start: these three bananas walked into a bar...

from Bartleby for Peter Culley

Remember leisure poets who invert the body’s response?  They yield to an earlier image, back when fruit dots were candies of the gods.  A twilit lozenge in the wake of dawn’s burst.  Dispatched to that suckling place – a pure exposure or announcement before skin.  That’s the ticket, pleased to admit one.  A baby shower that delivers a pillar from the waif.  Advertisements followed by popcorn and sticky feet.  The Magi caught looking can’t get enough.  Dead letters arrive just in time.

Friday, April 3, 2015

Welcome to the Philanthropocene

defacto loss leaders
breastless spigot
for honeyed image
for brute
with the monied eyes

my other glasses
emerald wides
recharged on the grid
keep their own accounts

narrative loss

write it down